News

  • 26

    June

    2016

    Hacking my bike with a black box flight recorder

      People tell me that cycling in Singapore is dangerous, and drivers are crazy.As a Kiwi, who has been living the dream in Singapore for the last nine months, I can vouch for this – in fact; it’s nearly as dangerous as riding on the roads in New Zealand! Luckily, as a guy who loves both riding and tech gadgets I’ve prepared myself.The idea was to find a recording “black box” for my bike – like planes have (hopefully I have less dire consequences for when to use it). I have my iPhone and apps for location mapping, Heart Rate monitor and Apple Watch for vitals. Then it occurred to me that all drivers over here have video recording to trap incidents and near-incidents. Why not the same for my bike?   So I tried traditional cameras. With little success. Both the battery life and the need to manage recordings...
  • 22

    June

    2016

    The best way to wear and mount a HD video camera

    About the technology Rather than fill this post with technical jargon and revolutionary talk of how we’ve created something never seen before, let's just throw some good old-fashioned honesty onto the table. We fitted some magnets into the back of the camera and then encased the rest in hardened, non-toxic rubber to create what we call a backing plate. We ensured that the polarity of the magnets was such that they would attract each other, come rain or shine. And this was the foundation for Magnatach.   Why Magnatach? We were tired, as consumers ourselves, of buying a product, only to have to go out and purchase additional mounts, SD cards and other technical items to make the camera do what it said it would do on the box. We want our products to work as well as possible, right out of the box. We tested various other products in...
  • 10

    June

    2016

    New camera software update process

    As part of the new iOS application that will be released soon, we have significantly upgraded the camera’s firmware as well as the iOS app; it’s imperative that when you upgrade the new iOS application, you also update the camera's firmware immediately. You must ensure the camera is connected to USB power for this installation.  The firmware update process for meMINI occurs in three key steps: The firmware is downloaded from our servers to the meMINI app in your smartphone. The firmware is transferred to your camera The camera installs the firmware, the automated process for the installation is as follows: the camera will begin the installation, the blue and white LED flash in sequence as it’s installed and then the camera will restart. While the camera installs the firmware; it is CRITICAL you don't interrupt this process, doing so will cause fatal damage to your camera.  If you connect to your camera...
  • 06

    June

    2016

    New iOS application and camera firmware

    This week we will be releasing our brand new iOS application and new camera firmware. These will dramatically improve the performance of the camera and the experience when it is connected to your iOS device.   The key changes are: New graphics and user interface New connection process, get connected to your camera even easier and quicker. All videos automatically save to your camera roll 2x faster transfer speeds Progress indicator on every video Ability to download individual videos Customizable download sequence Stop and restart downloads whenever you choose Changed Blue Led sequence for Wi-Fi Slow flash - Wi-Fi starting up Solid - Wi-Fi ready to connect Improved Wi-Fi stability   An update to the Android application will be coming soon. Prior to the Android update, we will let you know the slight differences that we have been able to make that are enabled by the Android platform.
  • 15

    May

    2016

    Introducing meMini’s HD video camera with Recall

    A history of video cameras The very first video cameras were designed to produce TV shows and movies. These were all carefully scripted and staged to avoid wasting camera time, and more importantly, production time. You wouldn’t want to make Harrison Ford wait around now, would you? As a result, TV productions and films all involved very large editing teams whose jobs consisted of whittling down vast amounts of video footage into the (somewhat excellent) movies and shows we see today. Editing one minute’s worth of footage often took between one and three hours. This meant that an hour-long programme could take between 60 and 180 hours of editing. That’s right. 180 hours. Or as I’d like to think of it, a week’s holiday in Venice. Gondola ride, anyone? Why this doesn’t work for us Now, let’s do a few simple calculations. The rest of us non-film stars don’t live...

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